Desert

Desert

In 1961, Peveril Meigs divided desert regions on Earth into three categories according to the amount of precipitation they received. In this now widely accepted system, extremely arid lands have at least twelve consecutive months without precipitation, arid lands have less than 250 mm (10 in) of annual precipitation, and semiarid lands have a mean annual precipitation of between 250 and 500 mm (10–20 in). Both extremely arid and arid lands are considered to be deserts while semiarid lands are generally referred to as steppes when they are grasslands. [11]

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin desertum , from Latin, neuter of desertus , past participle of deserere to desert, from de- + serere to join together — more at series

"to leave one's duty," late 14c., from Old French deserter (12c.) "leave," literally "undo or sever connection," from Late Latin desertare , frequentative of Latin deserere "to abandon, to leave, forsake, give up, leave in the lurch," from de- "undo" (see de- ) + serere "join together, put in a row" (see series ). Military sense is first recorded 1640s. Related: Deserted ; deserting .

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